California Transparency in Supply Chains Act of 2010

(Illustration) Shipping AirplaneBy Dana Howells

After almost five years since passage, California’s Attorney General has finally produced guidance on The California Transparency in Supply Chains Act of 2010. With the Attorney General at last weighing in (the Resource Guide is a hefty 50 pages) on this somewhat arcane legislation, covered companies may want to revisit posted disclosure statements in light of the new guidance.

Is my company covered? The law requires certain retailers and manufacturers doing business in the Golden State to disclose their efforts (or the lack thereof) towards eliminating human trafficking and slavery at every stage of production from acquiring raw materials to assembling finished goods. Your company may be covered if:

  • It identifies as a “manufacturer” or “retail seller” in its principal activity codes on California tax filings; and
  • Its worldwide gross receipts exceed $100 million, no matter where the company is domiciled; and
  • It is “doing business in California,” as defined in the California Revenue and Taxation Code (a complicated multi-part definition that includes paying just over a threshold of $50,000 for compensation in California or owning property worth just over $50,000 in California).

Every year, the California Franchise Tax Board furnishes the California Attorney General with a list of companies FTB believes are covered.

What must covered companies disclose? Covered businesses must disclose—conspicuously on their websites and within 30 days of a request—their efforts (or lack thereof) in five areas:
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