Seyfarth Synopsis: Headlining the number of employment-related bills California legislators introduced by the February 19th deadline are those that would extend COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave and provide other leaves and accommodations.

After last year’s pandemic-caused truncation of the 2020 legislative session—in which the governor signed only 372 new laws, the fewest since 1967—many expected the introduction of a large
Continue Reading Legislative Update: Paid Leave and Accommodation Tops 2021 Legislative Year

Seyfarth Synopsis: California’s Department of Fair Employment and Housing released 16 new FAQs regarding the recently enacted Pay Data Reporting Law, previously summarized here. The new FAQs address several key issues, including how to calculate the triggering 100-employee threshold and what the reporting requirements are for employees who work, live, or telecommute inside or outside of California.

Employers have
Continue Reading Asked and Answered: Updates on California’s Pay Data Reporting Law

Seyfarth Synopsis: The California Legislature has passed a series of employment-related bills for Governor Newsom to consider. He has until September 30 to approve or veto these bills, most of which relate to leaves of absence and COVID relief.

Monday, August 31st (or, really, the wee hours of September 1) marked the Legislature’s last day to pass bills to Governor
Continue Reading California Employment Legislative Update: Time for Governor Newsom to Get to Work

Our guest author, Lisa Hart, is a highly-trained double certified coach and member of the International Coach Federation who enjoyed a successful legal career on Wall Street as a litigator for 20+ years. Lisa excels at helping attorneys and other high performers find greater success and satisfaction, personally and professionally.  She can be reached through her website for a complimentary sample session. While her views do not necessarily reflect those of the authors or Seyfarth Shaw LLP, Ms. Hart offers a thoughtful perspective worthy of careful consideration.

Yahoo!’s recent decision to ban its work-at-home program raised concern for some about the future of telecommuting.  The good news is that most companies offer some sort of work-at-home arrangement because doing so is positively correlated with higher retention rates, lower absenteeism, and greater productivity and employee satisfaction.  Still, working at home can be challenging for both employer and employee.  The following guidelines will help both sides design telecommuting arrangements that are effective, productive and mutually satisfying.

1.    Design a Workable Plan.

Employees: You need to meet professional responsibilities and goals.  Consider what support elements you need in place in order to do that.  What are your employer’s expectations and needs?  Are there weekly meetings that you’ll need to attend in person?  Don’t commit to an arrangement that you know you’ll have difficulty sustaining. 
Employers:  Depending on your company’s size, consider telecommuting guidelines and/or policies for the sake of ease, managing  expectations and ensuring consistency in approach.


Continue Reading Making Working from Home “Workable”

What’s the latest in telecommuting?  If you have many employees who rely on their ability to work from home, you probably were interested to hear of a change in trend in telecommuting.  Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer caused an uproar when it was leaked to the public that the company’s “work-from-home” policy was being revoked.  People seemed shocked that such a


Continue Reading So I Have to Get Dressed and Come to Work? The “Work-at-Home” Debate Continues, but What About “Reasonable Accommodation” Obligations?