2016 Cal-Peculiarities

Seyfarth Synopsis: On September 25 (yes, a Sunday), Governor Brown signed into law Senate Bill 1241. SB 1241, effective January 1, 2017, adds Section 925 to the Labor Code to restrain the ability of employers to require employees to litigate or arbitrate employment disputes (1) outside of California or (2) under the laws of

Authored by Christopher A. Crosman.

We are excited to announce the 16th edition of Seyfarth Shaw’s publication Litigating California Wage & Hour and Labor Code Class Actions. As in previous editions, this publication reviews the most commonly filed wage and hour and Labor Code class and representative claims and the development of the

Seyfarth Synopsis: California’s rules on rest breaks are still developing. Recent cases have addressed the timing of rest breaks, and whether employees (particularly those who remain “on call”) must be relieved of all duty during breaks.

Our fair state has long imposed peculiar—and specific—requirements for employee work breaks. Varying interpretations of the rules for meal

Seyfarth Synopsis: Many employers have “no fault” attendance policies in place to manage employee absenteeism.  Are these policies putting California employers on shaky ground? Read on….

“No fault” attendance policies are one popular method among employers to, with consistency, counsel, discipline and, in some instances, terminate employees who rack up excessive absences.  Under these policies,

Seyfarth Synopsis: Have you pondered the implications of hiring help around the house? Here are some legal requirements regarding employment of domestic helpers.

Household workers or “domestic helpers” are people who work within a private household or on their employer’s premises. They include cleaners, maids, groundskeepers, dog walkers, cooks, nurses, home masseuses, personal trainers,

Seyfarth Synopsis: Sustained cuts to California’s court system have strained access to justice across the state, and not enough is being done to fix the situation.  But, you can help!

Since the “Great Recession” of 2008, California’s court system has seen unprecedented reductions in funding, further straining the resources of an already overburdened court system. 

Seyfarth Synopsis: We’ve regularly reported on California’s peculiar paid sick leave laws. Not counting industry-specific paid sick laws (e.g., the Long Beach and Los Angeles ordinances regulating hotel employers), there are now six California city ordinances mandating paid sick leave.[1] This week’s focus is on changes to the San Diego law, effective September 2

Seyfarth Synopsis: When the decision is to terminate, getting the basics right can go a long way toward preventing claims down the road by departing employees. 

Inevitably, at some point, every employment relationship comes to an end. For many people, where they work and what they do is a source of pride and self-worth,

Seyfarth Synopsis: In leaves of absence, as in employment law generally, California can be peculiar. We examine at a few examples, including particular city ordinances in Emeryville and San Francisco, and other statewide oddities such as voting, organ/tissue donation, and reckless student leave.

In the weird, wonderful, and often complex world of California leave

Seyfarth Synopsis: A court has temporarily suspended the deadline for employers to elect the statutory “safe harbor” for purposes of complying with recent legislation that makes it even more difficult for employers that pay with a piece rate rather than an hourly rate for any portion of an employee’s work.  

As we previously reported