Seyfarth Synopsis: In vetoing the California Legislature’s attempt to criminalize arbitration agreements (AB 3080), Governor Brown displayed common sense and the legal learning provided by recent U.S. Supreme Court authority.

Haven’t high courts already upheld mandatory arbitration agreements?

Yes, they have. The California and U.S. Supreme Courts have repeatedly ruled that employers may require employees

Seyfarth Synopsis. Pending California legislation would make a mandatory arbitration agreement an unlawful practice under the Fair Employment and Housing Act, and a crime. How could that be consistent with the Federal Arbitration Act?

Under current law, California businesses can insist that employees and contractors enter valid agreements to resolve disputes in front of a

Seyfarth Synopsis: California courts are often hostile towards defendants that seek to require litigious employees to honor their arbitration agreements. The defendant’s plight might seem more stark still if the defendant has not itself signed the agreement. But defendant employers still have means of enforcing such agreements, which can be especially significant in class actions

Seyfarth Synopsis: On September 25 (yes, a Sunday), Governor Brown signed into law Senate Bill 1241. SB 1241, effective January 1, 2017, adds Section 925 to the Labor Code to restrain the ability of employers to require employees to litigate or arbitrate employment disputes (1) outside of California or (2) under the laws of

Tearing contract sheetOn August 31, the California Legislature passed AB 465, aiming to “ensure that a contract to waive any of the rights, penalties, remedies, forums, or procedures under the Labor Code”—such as an arbitration agreement—is “a matter of voluntary consent.” This bill, now before Governor Brown for his approval, raises two big questions: (1) will the

HiResIn this season of family road trips and every parent’s favorite question from the back seat—“are we there yet?”—California employers on the road to arbitration recently received some good directions from the Supreme Court. As explained here by our very own Pam Vartabedian, the California Supreme Court recently smoothed over some bumps in that

By Christopher Crosman

Navigating the shoals of California law on arbitration agreements has been exceedingly difficult.  The California Supreme Court has maintained a long tradition of general antipathy to mandatory arbitration, and has been particularly hostile to arbitration agreements that limit a plaintiff’s ability to pursue a class action.  For example, Discover Bank v. Superior