Seyfarth Synopsis: A unique element of Cal/OSHA is its requirement that ALL employers have a written Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP). 8 CCR 3203.

Despite the IIPP requirement being “on the books” since 1991, many employers with establishments in California still do not have an IIPP. In fact Cal/OSHA issues more citations

Seyfarth Synopsis: When faced with wildfires or natural disasters, California employers must keep calm, carry on, and continue to meet their obligations under California law.

Be Prepared.

All employers, not just those in California, must have an Emergency Action Plan (“EAP”) and Fire Prevention Plan (“FPP’).

California regulations state that an EAP should include (1)

Seyfarth Synopsis: Cal/OSHA’s new emergency regulation for workers exposed to wildfire smoke creates new obligations for many employers.

An emergency regulation on Protection from Wildfire Smoke applies to outdoor workers and to workers in semi-indoor places. Examples include day laborers, agricultural workers, landscapers, construction workers, and sanitation workers. Requirements (described below) kick in when

Seyfarth Synopsis: As the mercury rises, California employers must comply with regulatory requirements to keep their employees cool.  Employers should be aware of Cal/OSHA’s existing requirements for outdoor workplaces and proposed rules which could turn up the heat on indoor employers.

California Keeps It Cool

For many years, Cal/OSHA has distinguished itself from Federal

By Joshua M. HendersonIlana R. MoradyJames L. Curtis, and Craig B. Simonsen

Seyfarth Synopsis: CalOSHA published a news release TODAY, on a new emergency regulation for the electronic submission of CY 2017 Form 300A on Occupational Injuries and Illnesses.  CalOSHA submitted the rule yesterday, and will allow public comments

Seyfarth Synopsis: Halloween is lurking just around the corner, and workplace festivities may present unusual challenges. Unsafe or offensive costumes, religious discrimination, and harassment are among the issues potentially facing employers around this time of year. Here are some tips to avoid the tricks and enjoy the treats.

Exorcise Your Right to Have Fun

It’s

Seyfarth Synopsis: As of August 30, 2018, California businesses must provide the public with more information about dangerous chemicals present at the business location. Many California employers will comply with the new requirements through the Cal/OSHA-required workplace hazardous communication program. For occupational exposures that do not meet the thresholds for HazMat communications, posting new

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Fair Employment and Housing Council issues regulations to implement California’s employment and housing anti-discrimination laws, including the FEHA, the CFRA, and the Unruh and Ralph Civil Rights Acts. The FEHC also conducts inquiries and holds hearings on various civil rights issues. The latest FEHC meeting was held on December 11, 2017. Our

ABC Soup

California legislators and regulators continue their efforts to expand employee protections, and the IRS permits a temporary subsidy for separating employees who want to sample the small business exchanges for health care.  Read on for highlights.

San Francisco Retail Workers Bill Of Rights Redux: The State Legislature Is Cooking Up Trouble Outside

By Joshua M. Henderson

Consider this not-so-hypothetical example.  An employer in California receives a citation from Cal/OSHA for a relatively minor safety violation involving no employee injuries.  Maybe the citation was for inadequate training on a particular workplace hazard.  The citation carries with it a penalty of $500.  The employer could appeal the citation, and spend perhaps thousands of dollars to challenge the citation through a hearing before an Administrative Law Judge; or, it could write a check for $500, agree to fix the violation, and be done with it.  In this light, the former response may seem extravagant, while the latter response could be seen as a rational business decision.  

Now, fast forward two years from the date that the employer spent $500 to make that previous violation go away.  The employer abated the prior violation by adequately training its employees shortly after paying the penalty.  A newly-hired employee, however, failed to receive training on the same workplace hazard and suffered a serious injury when exposed to the hazard.  After its investigation, the Division of Occupational Safety and Health (the investigative and prosecutorial arm of Cal/OSHA) cites the employer for a “repeat” violation.  A “repeat” violation carries with it a significant increase in penalties: that $500 penalty now transforms into a serious, repeat violation  with a penalty of up to $36,000.  If the untrained employee had been killed, the employer would face a repeat penalty amount of up to $50,000, and the employer (and the responsible managers) would face potential criminal liability.

This is not a fanciful scenario.  Under Cal/OSHA, employers are required to have an Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) in place to identify and respond to particular hazards in a workplace.  In addition, the IIPP regulation mandates that employers train their employees on the hazards in the workplace.  Yet, employers may be lulled into settling a Cal/OSHA citation by a short-term cost-benefit analysis of a particular citation and its accompanying penalties.  But, except perhaps where an employer is in financial distress, the penalties should not be an employer’s chief concern.  Instead, the focus should be on answering these questions:
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