Seyfarth Synopsis: Headlining the employment-related bills that passed the May 27, 2022, House of Origin Deadline is AB 85, which extended COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave to September of this year, as well as bills related to accommodations, leaves, retaliation, and workers’ compensation.

On the deadline for bill introduction, back in February, California legislators introduced 611 bills between the
Continue Reading California Legislative Update: What’s Left To Affect You?

Seyfarth Synopsis: In recognition of PAGA’s failure to protect California’s workers for the past 18 years, and the tremendous toll it has taken on California businesses, 2022 is the year to pass a proposed ballot initiative to amend this troublesome statute. The California Fair Pay and Accountability Act on the ballot this year aims to replace PAGA with alternative Labor
Continue Reading A New Year’s Resolution—Time to Replace PAGA

Seyfarth Synopsis:  On Saturday, October 9, 2021 Governor Newsom signed the last of 2021’s pending employment-related bills, including a bill imposing even more restrictions on settlement agreements. The new laws will become effective on January 1, 2022. This post summarizes the new approvals as well as other new key employment laws with which California employers will need to comply.

On
Continue Reading New Restrictions in Settlement and Severance Agreements Headline Governor Newsom’s Final 2021 Legislative Approvals

Seyfarth Synopsis:  On Monday, September 27, Governor Newsom signed a number of employment-related bills, including bills aimed at combatting wage theft and wage/hour violations by garment manufacturers, all of which go into effect on January 1, 2022. The Governor also vetoed two measures by Assembly member Lorena Gonzalez aimed at paid family leave and recall rights for hotel workers.

Going
Continue Reading Governor Signs Garment Manufacturer, Wage Theft, and Other Employment-Related Bills

Seyfarth Synopsis: Governor Gavin Newsom has approved AB 701, which will impose notice and other requirements on employers of employees subject to quotas in large California warehouse distribution centers, and has vetoed AB 616, an agricultural worker card check bill.

Acting on the first two major employment-related bills of interest to private employers, Governor Newsom on September 22, 2021 approved
Continue Reading Warehouse Quota Bill Signed, Agricultural Worker Card Check Bill Vetoed

Seyfarth Synopsis: While the Buggles took creative liberties when they claimed that Video Killed The Radio Star, the House of Origin deadline axed a number of employment-related bills. California legislators began this legislative session at the apex of the pandemic, introducing a flurry of COVID-19-related bills, many of which failed to survive the June 4, 2021 deadline to pass
Continue Reading California Legislative Update: House Of Origin Deadline Unplugs Employment Bills

Seyfarth Synopsis: Headlining the number of employment-related bills California legislators introduced by the February 19th deadline are those that would extend COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave and provide other leaves and accommodations.

After last year’s pandemic-caused truncation of the 2020 legislative session—in which the governor signed only 372 new laws, the fewest since 1967—many expected the introduction of a large
Continue Reading Legislative Update: Paid Leave and Accommodation Tops 2021 Legislative Year

Seyfarth Synopsis: The California Legislature has passed a series of employment-related bills for Governor Newsom to consider. He has until September 30 to approve or veto these bills, most of which relate to leaves of absence and COVID relief.

Monday, August 31st (or, really, the wee hours of September 1) marked the Legislature’s last day to pass bills to Governor
Continue Reading California Employment Legislative Update: Time for Governor Newsom to Get to Work

Seyfarth Synopsis: Employment-related cases pending before the California Supreme Court concern various questions that sometimes seem technical, but the answers they elicit will have big consequences. Questions raised by the current crop of cases include standing to sue, the availability of certain claims and remedies, federal preemption of California laws, what counts as compensable time, and—that perennial favorite—how to interpret
Continue Reading 2019 Employment Law: Cases Pending in the California Supreme Court

Seyfarth Synopsis: Members of the plaintiffs’ bar submit about 500 PAGA notices each month to California’s Labor and Workforce Development Agency. Each notice presages yet another PAGA lawsuit against yet another hapless California employer. But today we consider a new sort of PAGA-focused lawsuit. This recent complaint filed last week is not on behalf of a California law enforcement agency
Continue Reading Man Bites Dog: This PAGA Lawsuit Is Different