Seyfarth Synopsis: Even if bad Glassdoor reviews have you feeling like you need to fight back, employers should stay out of the ring, and instead implement social media policies that clearly define prohibited behavior and disclosures, while spelling out the consequences for violations. Employers must not retaliate against employees for their lawful out-of-office behavior.

People

Seyfarth Synopsis: With the availability of new vehicle GPS devices and smart phone tracking applications, employers need to be mindful of employee privacy rights when using location technologies in the workplace.

It Doesn’t Take A Magellan To Map Routes Anymore

Employers now have available the technology that concerned parents of wayward teenagers have often wished

EarthquakeYesterday, the National Labor Relations Board issued its much-anticipated decision in Browning-Ferris Industries of California, 362 NLRB No. 186 (August 27, 2015). By a 3-2 vote, the Board announced a new standard to determine whether multiple entities are “joint employers” of a single workforce. The Board will now inquire whether there is a common-law

By Nick Geannacopulos and Emily Barker

You have likely noticed that business interactions and the way people communicate professionally have declined in formality over recent years.  The “Friday Casual” day has become the casual week.  Formal letters have turned into short emails.  Even slang has devolved to emoticons and language unheard of in the workplace

By Jill Porcaro and Andrew Crane

As a well-intentioned employer, you know it is best to promptly investigate employee claims of workplace harassment  and other employee misconduct.  Due to the obvious sensitive nature of these types of investigations, you implement a policy prohibiting your employees from discussing the investigation with anyone other than the investigator.  You believe that your employees will feel more comfortable disclosing truthful information to the investigator knowing their confidences are assured.  Great policy, right?

  • Not exactly.  Now, more than ever, the National Labor Relations Board (the “Board”) is cracking down on blanket confidentiality policies that prohibit employees from discussing investigations of employee misconduct, including the right to discuss discipline or disciplinary investigations involving their fellow employees, on the grounds that these policies “chill” employees’ rights under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”).

In Banner Health System d/b/a Banner Estrella Medical Center, 358 NLRB No. 93 (July 30, 2012), an employer had a policy of prohibiting its employees who made complaints from discussing the matter with their coworkers while the investigation was ongoing.  The Board held that this rule violated the NLRA because an employer must justify a prohibition by showing a “legitimate business justification that outweighs employees’ Section 7 rights.”

Well then, I’ll just nicely suggest to my employees not discuss the details of any investigation.  That ought to solve the problem, right?
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