2015 Cal-Peculiarities

Quintessential early adapters and always on the go, we Californians love change, and we start trends. That’s good. There has been plenty of change this past year in the world of California labor and employment law. As Father Time prepares to tender his timekeeping duties to Baby New Year, let’s take a moment off the

This time of year gives us a chance to look back on what we’ve accomplished in the last twelve months. Our legislators and judges have kept us busy reporting on the ever-changing landscape that comes with employing folks in California. We saw our readership continue to grow and, with your support, won the very exciting

iStock_000000642401_LargeYesterday, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law AB 897, a “clean up” bill he requested to address an omission in AB 359, which Governor Brown had signed into law on August 17, 2015. This legislation, effective January 1, 2016, will require a successor grocery employer to retain eligible workers for a 90-day transitional period

 We are excited to announce that from a field of more than 2,000 potential nominees, our Cal-Peculiarities blog has received enough nominations (thank you!) to join the 250 legal blogs participating in The Expert Institute’s Best Legal Blog Competition!

Now that the blogs have been nominated and placed into their respective categories, it is up

Responsive Web Design Concept. VectorSince New Jersey led the way in 1994, many states have enacted so-called Megan’s Laws, which establish public online registries of individuals who have been convicted of a sex-based offense. California’s version of Megan’s Law is codified as California Penal Code § 290.46.

Section 290.46 requires all convicted sex offenders to register with the state’s

(Photo) SF StreetBy Laura Maechtlen and Jason Allen

As our loyal CalPecs blog readers know, in November 2014, San Francisco passed two ordinances—“Hours and Retention Protections for Formula Retail Employees” and “Fair Scheduling and Treatment of Formula Retail Employees”—colloquially known, together, as the “San Francisco Retail Workers’ Bill of Rights.”  (Our most recent update and a recent Management Alert can be found here and here, respectively.)  On July 7, 2015, the S.F. Board of Supes proved that the Bill of Rights is a living document by passing an amendment to the SF Workers’ Bill of Rights on the final reading.

Most significantly, the amendment changes the definition of employers covered by the ordinances.  The amendment also modifies some of the requirements imposed on employers and clarifies some open enforcement issues.  The Office of Labor Standards Enforcement (“OLSE”) has posted information about the amendment here and here, and the text of the amendment here. In short:
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(Illustration)CompetitionDear Friends and Loyal Readers,

We need your help!  The Cal-Peculiarities Employment Law Blog has been invited to participate in a “best legal blog competition” sponsored by The Expert Institute.   If you appreciate our weekly posts, we would very much appreciate your nominating us in the Labor & Employment category.

If our blog is selected