By Jonathan L. Brophy

Employees are often shocked to learn that employers are not required to provide paid vacations. But it’s true. Legal guarantees of paid leave abound in other advanced economies, but not in the United States, and not even in California. Indeed, the effect of California law is to discourage employers from voluntarily providing paid vacation, because California peculiarly mandates that if the employer offers paid vacation, then the vacation pay must be deemed to vest, with any unused portion being due when employment ends. So “use it or lose it” policies, for example, are not enforceable in California.

In response to this annoying California peculiarity, some employers have considered adopting “no vacation” policies, and “unlimited time off” policies for exempt employees. Below is a quick primer on such policies and some issues to consider before changing existing policies.
Continue Reading Vacation: No Pay for My Time Off? Exploring the Nuances of Unlimited or No Paid Time Policies

By Kristina Launey

This week sees California’s official adoption of two pro-employee measures: 

1)   Increase in the State Minimum Wage

             This morning, Governor Brown signed AB 10.  As we previously reported, this bill raises the minimum wage in two (2) $1.00 increments, from the current $8 per hour rate to $9 per hour effective