2013 Legislative Updates

By: Kristina Launey and Daniel Kim

As noted previously in this space, California already permits employees to take many kinds of protected time off not generally available in other parts of the country.  In 2013, California’s Legislature presented workers with even more kinds of legally-protected absences.  It is hard to begrudge leaves of absence

By Dana Peterson and Coby Turner

Depending on your view of the world, California legislators have either implemented much-needed protections for California’s immigrant workforce, or they have given the legislative equivalent of a “gift” to dishonest employees this holiday season.  Starting January 1, 2014, workers will have immunity from disciplinary action for providing updated “personal

By Kristina Launey 

Since the 2013 portion of this California Legislative session concluded in mid-September, a number of employment-related bills have gone to Governor Brown for consideration.  As of today, the Governor has signed 8 of those bills into law, covering:

✓   Minimum wage increase, from $8 to $10/hour, over two years

✓   Criminal

By Kristina Launey

This week sees California’s official adoption of two pro-employee measures: 

1)   Increase in the State Minimum Wage

             This morning, Governor Brown signed AB 10.  As we previously reported, this bill raises the minimum wage in two (2) $1.00 increments, from the current $8 per hour rate to $9 per hour effective

            What happens when an employee makes a claim for unpaid wages, and wins?  The employee, as the prevailing party, has a statutory right to recover the attorney’s fees reasonably incurred in achieving the victory. 

            What happens when an employee makes a claim for unpaid wages (other than minimum wage or overtime)[1] and loses?  The

Starting January 1, 2014, unemancipated minors working as extras or background performers will be able to take home their full pay, and their employers will be relieved of the obligation to maintain a trust for those minors.  AB 533, which Governor Brown signed into law yesterday, exempts employers of minors under contracts for artistic