Families First Coronavirus Response Act

Seyfarth Synopsis: On March 18, 2021, the California Senate voted to revive and expand the COVID-19 related supplemental paid sick leave law that expired on December 31, 2020, and Governor Newsom signed it into law the following evening. The law became effective immediately once signed, with a 10-day grace period for compliance, and it applies

Seyfarth SynopsisOn January 26, 2021, the County of Los Angeles passed an ordinance requiring both large and small employers in unincorporated parts of the County to provide supplemental COVID-19 related paid sick leave.

In the wake of the expiration of Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”)’s paid sick leave, and California’s state-wide COVID-19

Seyfarth Synopsis: September 30 was Governor Newsom’s last day to sign or veto bills the Legislature passed by its August 31 deadline. Some new laws—including COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave and workers’ compensation presumption—became effective immediately upon signing. Others—such as an expansion of CFRA and other leave rights, an EEO-1-like annual pay

Seyfarth Synopsis: On September 9, 2020, Governor Newsom signed Assembly Bill 1867, which requires private employers with 500 or more employees nationwide to provide COVID-19-related supplemental paid sick leave to their California employees. Impacted employers must begin providing this leave no later than September 19, 2020.

On September 9, 2020, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed

Seyfarth Synopsis: As employers expected, the pandemic has brought new challenges to managing a workforce, and of course, new litigation. Here we address hotspots of COVID-19 litigation in California to help employers know where they should be taking special care.

Participants on either side of recent employment litigation in California can often point to the

Seyfarth Synopsis: Last week, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors and the San Jose City Council enacted emergency ordinances to expand paid sick leave beyond that provided under the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act. While San Francisco’s Public Health Emergency Leave ordinance awaits Mayor London Breed’s signature, Mayor Sam Liccardo has signed the